Maximpact Blog

Refugee Gardens: Hope Planted in Exile

GardenLemonTree

In this, the eighth year of the Syrian War, life in Syrian refugee camps is undermined by trauma, poverty and homesickness. Yet in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, green sprouts of hope are shooting up.

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Insects, Plants Disappear, Eroding Food Security

BeeCrocus

Nearly half the world’s insect species are rapidly vanishing and more than a third are threatened with extinction, finds the first global scientific review of insect survival. The rate of insect extinction is eight times that of mammals, birds and reptiles…

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Finding Protein to Feed 10 Billion

steak

Sizzling juicy steaks, crispy fried chicken, tender pork sausages – all delicious but not sustainable as the world’s population balloons toward 10 billion finds new research conducted by the Oxford Martin School for the World Economic Forum.

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Fertilizing Europe’s Circular Economy

Productive fields in Altenhasungen, Hesse, Germany, June 18, 2008 (Photo by Evelyn Berg) Creative Commons license via Flickr

Negotiators from the European Parliament, Council and Commission have just reached political agreement on new EU rules for fertilizers proposed by the Commission in 2016 as a key deliverable of the Circular Economy Package.

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Climate Change Outlook: What Europeans Can Expect

DroughtSpain

If global warming rises more than 2°C above pre-industrial levels and no adequate adaptation measures are taken, Europe is at risk of being exposed to more frequent, intense extreme weather conditions with serious economic impacts.

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Scientists Find 27 New Viruses in Bees

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) Mwatate Sisal Plantation Dam, Kenya, June 13, 2013 (Photo by Peter Steward)

An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these crucial pollinators.

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Climate Change Could Shock Global Food Markets

cornfield

The warming climate is likely to result in increased volatility of grain prices, maize production shocks and reduced food security, finds new research published Monday in the U.S. journal “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.”

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Restoring Ruined Lands Reverses Trail of Misery

Excessive erosion on the U.S. Prairie. An inch of soil can take hundreds of years to form, but it can be swept away in a few seasons. Sediment loads in rivers silt up fish spawning beds, degrade drinking water quality, and cause silting of productive estuaries and reservoirs. March 27, 2017 (Photo by Rick Bohn / U.S. Fish & Wwildlife Service) Public domain

Human activities are degrading lands throughout the world, undermining the well-being of billions of people, driving mass migrations and violent conflicts, species extinctions and climate change, finds a new comprehensive assessment.

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Bees With Backpacks

BeeWithSensor

Thousands of honey bees are flying around Australia and Brazil with mini sensors on their backs as part of a world-first research program to monitor their movements. The point is to capture and analyze swarm sensing data …

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COP23 Fertilizes Climate-Smart Agriculture

HarvestGrapes

New commitments and initiatives in the agriculture and water sectors were announced as nearly 200 countries gathered at the United Nations Climate Conference (COP23) hosted by the government of Fiji in Bonn, November 6-17.

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Biochar: ‘Black Gold’ With a Hundred Uses

Biochar

Biochar can help address many environmental challenges, as people in Norway are just now discovering. This form of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage reduces the need for fertilizers, may lead to better crop yields and can remove heavy metals from the soil.

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What’s That in Your Fruit Salad?

Fruits and vegetables for sale at Le Marché de Noailles, Marseille, France, October 1, 2014 (Photo by kixmi71) Creative Commons license via Flickr

A pregnant woman eating a salad of fresh fruit grown by conventional agriculture in the European Union may think she is providing healthy nourishment to her future baby, but in fact she might be exposing it to a cocktail of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

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