Maximpact Blog

Low-Carbon Farming for Climate, Food and Profit

Brazilian farmers examine their soybean crop. 2015 (Photo by Lisa Rausch courtesy University of Wisconsin, Madison) Posted for media use

Morocco’s state-owned OCP Group, one of the world’s largest producers of phosphate fertilizers, has partnered with agtech companies and Brazilian growers for a first carbon farming and certification project. The project in the state of Mato Grosso will cover cotton, soybeans and corn, three common Brazilian crops for which vast swaths of the Amazon rainforest have been cleared.

+Read More

COP27: At-Risk Nations Celebrate New Climate Loss, Damage Fund

Young people stage one of many demonstrations in support of loss and damage reparations to be paid by rich countries that are major emitters of greenhouse gases to poorer countries that emit little climate pollution but suffer rising sea levels, fierce storms and other climate damages. November 19, 2022, Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt (Photo by IISD/ENB | Mike Muzurakis) Posted for media use

Overwhelmed by storms, drought, and rising seas, stressed out developing countries won creation of a fund for loss and damage at the UN’s annual climate conference, COP27. More than 45,000 participants gathered in this resort town at the tip of the Sinai Peninsula to negotiate implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate, build coalitions, solve problems, and find financing.

+Read More

10 Essential Climate Science Insights for 2022

Mohammad Shtayyeh, Prime Minister of Palestine, with Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the United Arab Emirates.

As world leaders, scientists and diplomats at the United Nations’ annual climate conference, COP27, struggle to agree on how to manage the extremes of climate change, global scientists presented the 10 essential scientific climate insights of the year as guideposts to negotiation.

+Read More

Meeting on the Green Side Is Easier Than Ever

Meeting on the Green Side Is Easier Than Ever

BONN, Germany, October 23, 2022 – Meetings, gatherings, conferences, summits, festivals, forums, caucuses, councils – large and small, events can be a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental impacts. Now a new, free online tool offers user-friendly solutions that can be used to lower greenhouse gas emissions and help reach climate goals.

+Read More

Sunny Abu Dhabi Signs Multiple Clean Energy Deals

Caption: People gather in the distinctive courtyard of the Masdar Institute for Science and Technology. (Photo courtesy World Scholarship Forum) Posted for media use
 https://worldscholarshipforum.com/

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, January 26, 2022 (Maximpact.com News) – Clean energy projects are springing up across a vast area of the world – from Eastern Europe and the Middle East, through Central Asia and as far east as Indonesia – founded on the work of Masdar, the renewable energy company based in Abu Dhabi.

+Read More

COP26 Glasgow Climate Pact Keeps 1.5°C Goal Alive

Negotiating through the night under replica of Planet Earth in the COP26 venue, delegates clarify talking points for the next day.  Glasgow, Scotland, November 2021 (Photo by Kiara Worth courtesy Earth Negotiations Bulletin) Used with permission

The UN climate conference COP26 concluded late Saturday night with a deal among 196 governments to forestall catastrophic climate change that hinged on a surprise development. Minutes before the final decision on the text of the Glasgow Climate Pact was taken, India proposed a weaker version of the language on coal.

+Read More

World Shaken By ‘Terrifying’ Climate Science Report

The Dixie Fire is an active wildfire in Butte, Plumas and Lassen Counties, California, named after the road where it started. The  largest single wildfire in the state's history, by August 11 the fire had burned 505,413 acres (204,533 ha) and destroyed several small towns. Smoke from the Dixie Fire caused unhealthy air quality throughout the Western United States. August 8, 2021 (Photo courtesy CALFIRE) Creative Commons license via Flickr

GENEVA, Switzerland, August 9, 2021 (ENS) – Wildfires, drought, floods, extreme weather across the globe – climate change is already here – widespread, rapid and intensifying. Some of the changes now happening, such as sea level rise, are irreversible over hundreds to thousands of years, warns a new expert report.

+Read More

Industrial-Scale Renewable Energy on the Rise

Wind turbines in Luxembourg (Photo by M-in-Berlin) Creative Commons license via Flickr

The transition to renewable energy in support of sustainable development goals and climate action is picking up speed around the world. With new urgency, the International Energy Agency, IEA, is calling for an end to exploration for fossil fuels – coal, oil and natural gas.

+Read More

Recycled Polyester Challenge Draws Global Fashion Brands

Polyester yarn is often used in fabric blends. This yarn is 20 percent silk, 20 percent cotton and 60 percent polyester. (Photo courtesy Scheepjes Secret Garden) Posted for media use.

Competitive fashion industry executives from throughout the world convened by the UN Climate Change agency have reached a consensus. They agree that a concerted recycling effort across the sector could cut waste, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and put the fashion industry on track to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

+Read More

Plant-centric Menus Offer Human & Planetary Health

Each year a bunch of heritage varieties of vegetables and fruits are grown in this backyard garden. July 31, 2010, Schiltern, Niederösterreich, Austria (Photo by Brigitte Rieser) Creative Commons license via Flickr

Designing and introducing children to sustainable school lunches that are climate friendly, nutritious, affordable and culturally appropriate – lunches they enjoy – does that sound impossible? Researchers at Stockholm-based Karolinska Institutet have done it. Their study shows a new lunch menu resulted in a 40 percent reduction in climate impact with no increase in cost or decrease in consumption.

+Read More

A Balancing Act: Climate Change Control Without Water Stress

A bioenergy field trial in Wisconsin is evaluating how switchgrass, Miscanthus, corn stover, poplar trees, and native prairie grasses stack up against each other. (Photo by Gregg Sanford / Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Creative Commons License via Flickr

To avoid serious water scarcity, future biomass plantations for energy production and carbon emissions control will need sustainable water management, researchers from Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research show in a new study. Otherwise, irrigation of biomass plantations may increase global water stress more than climate change.

+Read More

Wait: Don’t Toss That Food, It Could Fuel the Car

The United States wastes an estimated 40 percent of all the food the country produces. (Photo courtesy National Conference of State Legislators) Public domain

“When we eat, our bodies convert food into energy that fuels our lives. But what happens to the energy stored in the 80 billion pounds of food thrown away annually in America?” asks Steven Ashby, director of the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland. As part of advancing sustainable energy solutions, scientists at the lab he runs are converting tons of food waste into clean, renewable biofuel that could power cars, planes and trains.

+Read More

Communities Cope With a New Climate Reality, Naturally

A community group in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo makes plans for a fish farming project that will help with water management. February 7, 2020 (Photo by Axel Fassio courtesy CIFOR) Creative Commons license via Flickr

A new climate reality is here, now. The year 2020 was one of the three warmest on record, and rivalled 2016 for the top spot, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) concludes after consolidating five international datasets. A naturally occurring climate phenomenon, La Niña, cooled things off only at the very end of the year.

+Read More

Sustainability: Megacity Mayors Map a ‘Future That Works for Everyone’

Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti speaks with the media at the Moving America Forward Forum hosted by United for Infrastructure, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. February 16, 2020 (Photo by Gage Skidmore) Creative Commons license via Flickr

The mayors of 97 of the world’s largest cities, members of the C40 global network of cities, have agreed to revitalize the post-pandemic world by creating green jobs, investing in public services, supporting essential workers, greening public spaces, and protecting struggling mass transit systems until the virus recedes and riders return.

+Read More