Maximpact Blog

Climate-Safe World Means Millions of New Energy Jobs

Sun glints off one of the many solar panels atop the IRENA headquarters building in Masdar City, UAE. A 1,000 m2 solar photovoltaic rooftop system produces 305,000 kWh of electricity annually in addition to solar hot water. The renewable energy output of the building covers about 10 percent of the building's energy demand. 2015 (Photo courtesy IRENA) Posted for media use

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, July 19, 2021 (Maximpact.com News) – “We have no time. The window is closing and the pathway to a net-zero future is narrowing.” With these warning words, Francesco La Camera, who heads the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), opened his Foreword to IRENA’s latest analysis, “World Energy Transitions Outlook.”

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Industrial-Scale Renewable Energy on the Rise

Wind turbines in Luxembourg (Photo by M-in-Berlin) Creative Commons license via Flickr

The transition to renewable energy in support of sustainable development goals and climate action is picking up speed around the world. With new urgency, the International Energy Agency, IEA, is calling for an end to exploration for fossil fuels – coal, oil and natural gas.

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Refugee Camps Rely on Renewables

Jordan’s Za’atari refugee camp made the switch to clean energy in November 2017 with the inauguration of the largest solar power plant ever built in a refugee setting. (Photo by Yousef Al Hariri courtesy UNHCR) Posted for media use

In Iraq, displaced people struggle with the loss of electric power as blackouts and brownouts remain frequent even at grid-connected settlements, leaving refugees and the humanitarian community dependent on expensive, polluting diesel generators. In Ethiopia, most refugees lack any reliable access at all to electric lighting.

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Energy Poverty Can Follow Shift to Renewables

TanzanianHut

Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but they do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new study from Portland State University.

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