Maximpact Blog

Displaced Syrians Learn via Smartphone Intranet

Never too young to enjoy a smartphone, Hafjin, a three-year-old Syrian refugee, looks at family photos from Syria on her father's phone. 2016 (Photo © Sumaya Agha for Mercy Corps) Posted for media use

Distance learning has become routine for many students during the COVID-19 lockdown, but for thousands of young Syrians living in refugee camps distance learning has been an impossible luxury. Yet, an innovative project established in one camp allows internally displaced schoolchildren to communicate and pursue their education using smartphones – without the need for internet or computers.

+Read More

Helping Syrian refugees build new lives in the UK

online language training case study

Language learning makes a difference. Language learning breaks down barriers, builds communities and offers opportunity to people around the world. Nowhere is this clearer than in the work we have been doing with Maximpact to support Syrian refugees in Northern Ireland since May 2018.

+Read More

Refugee Kids Quicker Than Adults at Languages

This boy from Syria was 11-years-old at the time of this picture in 2013. He was living with his family in a makeshift tent shelter in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley. He hadn't been to school for two years because of the conflict, but then he was granted two hours of schooling every day. "The best thing about being back at school is that I can study again," he said. "I want to be a doctor when I'm older, and I really like to study and learn." (Photo courtesy UK Dept. of International Development) Creative Commons license via Flickr

As millions of displaced people move around the world in search of safer lives, learning the language of their adopted homes is a skill best acquired young. Scientists say there appears to be a critical period for language learning, although the length of this period and its underlying causes remain to be unraveled.

+Read More

Maximpact Equips Job-Seeking Refugees With English Online

SyrianWomenComputers

Waleed, a Syrian refugee living in Northern Ireland, was a structural engineer and architect in his native land. After fleeing the deadly threats and upheaval of war, he suffered PSTD and social isolation, but through Maximpact’s live, online pre-entry English classes for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), Waleed has made great progress in learning English and in social interaction.

+Read More

Syrian Refugees End Ramadan With Joy and Longing

Caroline Kennedy; Sara, a Syrian refugee studying to be a hair stylist; and Abir, a student in Maximpact's Online Language class; Portadown, Northern Ireland, April 17, 2019 (Photo courtesy Caroline Kennedy via email)

Muslims around the world celebrated the Eid-al-Fitr religious holiday on Tuesday, marking the end of Islam’s holy month of Ramadan, during which the faithful abstain from eating and drinking during daylight hours, pray and practice charitable giving.

+Read More

Redesigning Refugee Camps for the Digital Age

ZaatariModule

A Syrian refugee living in a Jordanian camp, or an immigrant to the United States, will have multiple associations with place enabled by digital technology,” says Professor Rana Abudayyeh from the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture and Design. “They may live in a new environment, but they carry archival memories and images of their home with them on smart devices…

+Read More

Turkey Helps Syrian Refugee Girls Avoid Child Marriage

“Young girls who have fled conflict and instability in rural Syria in search of a more peaceful and dignified life in Turkey can find themselves still at risk from a harmful traditional practice their families have brought from their homeland,” warn three women and a man writing for the Turkish Red Crescent …

+Read More

EU Helps Turkey Shelter Four Million Refugees

SyrianRefugeesTurkey-315x305

Almost four million registered refugees live in Turkey – Syrians, Iraqis, Afghans, Iranians, and Somalis, among others – making Turkey the country with the highest number of refugees in the world. Almost half of them are children.

+Read More

Maximpact Offers Language Help for Refugees

SyrianGirlsLearning

“I want to help” is “Ana bady asa’ed” in Arabic, the language of much of Syria. This simple translation illustrates the steep learning curve Syrian refugees face trying to re-start their lives in an English-speaking country…

+Read More