Maximpact Blog

Solar-Powered Mobile Desalination on the Horizon – Water

"I drink because I'm thirsty," says this boy who lives in the state of Tamil Nadu, India. March 20, 2016 (Photo by Nithi Anand) Creative Commons license via Flickr

Harnessing the sun to bring mobile desalination units that make fresh drinking water to remote and disaster-struck communities will be possible within five years, say researchers at the University of Bath. They have developed a revolutionary desalination process that can be operated in mobile, solar-powered units.

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Drugs in Our Drinking Water

A variety of pharmaceuticals, September 25, 2019 (Photo by Marco Verch) Creative Commons license via Flickr

A single pharmaceutical manufacturing facility is changing the water quality of one of Europe’s most important rivers, the Rhine, Swiss researchers report. Compounds in the water may be biologically active, toxic or persistent, but treatment plants cannot remove them before the treated water is discharged into waterways that serve as drinking water sources.

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Purifying Clay to Relieve Thirsty Pakistan

PakistanClay

An abundant supply of fresh, clean water soon will be a reality in Pakistan’s semi-arid South Punjab region, following the announcement of a new international partnership agreement based on clay, spearheaded by the Government of Pakistan and driven by the UK’s University of Huddersfield.

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Efficient Solar Still Makes Seawater Drinkable

DesalDiagram

A new level of efficiency in using sunlight to turn seawater into fresh drinking water has been achieved. The completely passive solar-powered desalination system could provide more than 5.6 liters (1.5 gallons) of potable water an hour for every square meter of solar collecting area.

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Community Solutions – effecting real change

UN Sustainable Development Goals

It’s become more critical than ever to find solutions to the world’s most pressing social and environmental issues. From challenges around energy, waste and water, to the growing refugee crisis, communities need to find positive ways to address these complex issues, and to start building a more sustainable future.

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‘Silent Voices’ of Water Heard in Stockholm

Dr Jackie King

Humanity can tackle today’s major challenges only if access to water is more fairly distributed. When World Water Week, the leading event on global water issues, opened on Monday, speakers called for an immediate and drastic shift in how water is shared and managed.

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Hotter, Drier UK Launches ‘Love Water’ Campaign

Parched fields in Somerset, England, August 6, 2018 (Photo by Steve Keiretsu) Creative commons license via Flickr.

The United Kingdom is famous for its rain, which has inspired poets as well as weather forecasters, but now the British public is being asked to help the country protect its water resources for future generations. The campaign was launched July 31 by more than 40 environmental groups, charities, water companies and regulators with the slogan “Love Water.”

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Europe Boots Mining Into the 21st Century

SilverMineFinland

The European Union is already one of the world’s major consumers of minerals and metallic raw materials, and demand is expected to grow quickly. The EU wants to mine those minerals and raw materials on its own territory, but at the same time would like to avoid invasive, destructive mining practices that have given the industry a bad reputation throughout the world.

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UN Appeal Asks $920 Million for Rohingya Refugees

Within a bamboo hut in the world’s largest refugee settlement, Rohingya refugee Syed Hossain, 27, lifts his shirt to display the blisters on his side. An outbreak of chickenpox has infected some 5,000 Rohingya in the vast Kutupalong settlement.

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Water For All by 2030

As spring approaches across the Northern Hemisphere, people are planning for planting and for the impact of hotter weather on water supplies. This is the time for World Water Day, designated by the United Nations as a day to focus on freshwater – the most essential element of life.

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Asia-Pacific Business Aligns With Natural World

WillowsBeijing

Advancing green business across Asia and the Pacific is “…a win–win for all stakeholders, but requires mobilizing vast resources of private capital and innovative management approaches,” the Asian Development Bank (ADB) concludes in a new working paper on “The Business of Greening: Policy Measures for Green Business Development in Asia.”

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Wringing More Value From Pakistan’s Water

No country’s economy is more water-intensive than Pakistan’s, and this degree of water use, combined with a warming climate, is leading to drought, water scarcity and arsenic-contaminated groundwater in the South Asian nation.

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World’s Large Rivers Drying Up

River red gum trees in a dry river bed at Silverton, population 89, New South Wales, Australia, April 19, 2016 (Photo by Nina Matthews Photography) Creative Commons license via Flickr

It’s a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. The large rivers of the world are drying up, and the culprit is the drying of soils, say scientists in a new study.

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New Electrochemical Method Eliminates Mercury From Water

GoldMineWorker

Water contaminated with mercury and other toxic heavy metals is a major cause of environmental damage and health problems worldwide. Now, researchers at Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology have devised a new way to clean contaminated water – through an electrochemical process.

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